Toasted Coconut Rice With Bok Choy and Fried Eggs

This is a super easy one pot recipe. And it’s totally low fodmap to boot! The recipe is made in layers so everything cooks the right amount of time. I made the dish at the beginning of the week, but just made one egg at a time as needed. I think this is a great basic recipe and I love the one pot idea, but the ratios were off. There was too much rice for the amount of veggies or eggs. I would double the amount of veggies. I also think this recipe probably calls for 5-6 eggs instead of 4.

I liked this and didn’t mind eating it all week (after adding more veggies) but I felt like the flavor was a bit on the bland side. I’d like to take this idea and play with it to add some complexity of flavor.

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Pickled Rice Tabbouleh

I’ve been sick so much of the time lately, I haven’t felt like cooking. But one thing I have been playing with is experimenting with ways to increase the soluble fiber in my diet. Since barley is one of the few low fodmap high soluble fiber foods, I was intrigued when I saw this recipe on a list saying it was good with barley instead of rice. The recipe is rather unusual for something calling itself “tabbouleh”. It uses a pickle juice base and incorporates a raw herb sauce instead of the standard chopped herbs and veggies you’d find in tabbouleh.

I wasn’t crazy about the dish overall. I found the pickle juice flavor weird and I didn’t love the barley in it. I also really missed the usual tabbouleh veggies. I added some cherry tomatoes and found they really enhanced it.

But oh my gosh, this toasted pumpkin seed sauce…it’s like nothing I’ve ever made before. And jeeze is it good. I won’t be making this dish again but I’ll definitely incorporate this sauce into some other dishes. Plus, pumpkin seeds are also high in soluble fiber. So win win!

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/pickled-rice-tabbouleh

Sprouted Mung Beans with Coconut and Spices

Sprouted mung beans are one of the few forms of legume I can currently consume, but I don’t have much to do with them. I was excited to find a recipe for spiced mung beans in the Indian Vegetarian Cookbook. The recipe does contain lots of spices, but still wasn’t super flavorful. I left out the dried coconut to avoid the fructose, so maybe it would have been more flavorful with the coconut. However, since it is at least a somewhat interesting way to eat low fodmap sprouted beans, I’d make this again, possibly doubling the spices and adding something creamy at the end.

Pasta with Raw Tomato Sauce

I’ve been sick a lot lately, so last week I decided just to make some simple carb dishes that would be easy on my digestion. The weather has been so weird this fall that I still had tomatoes ripening into mid October. I found this recipe for a raw tomato sauce on page 86 of Nonna’s Italian Kitchen. This was a really interesting concept and super easy. You just put all the ingredients in the blender and then add the sauce to the still hot pasta.

In order to make this low fodmap, I use wild garlic instead of fresh garlic, so the taste was definitely different than it would have been otherwise. But it wasn’t bad. The main issue with the sauce was that it was too liquidy. But after I refrigerated the dish, the issue was resolved. So this was much better the second day. I liked this but didn’t love it. Might try making it again once (if) I can eat garlic again.

Roasted Veggie Tahini Bowl

I found a recipe for roasted broccoli and mushroom bowls in the New York Times, which gave me the idea for this recipe. I adapted it to be vegan, low fodmap, and gluten free and made it for Ian. We both loved it! Ian had thirds. I’d definitely make this again, but next time I’d add a third (and 4th?) veggie to reduce the fodmap content, since this ended up being too much broccoli and mushroom for me to tolerate.

For the bowls:

2 cups cooked rice

Prepare the tofu:

2 blocks tofu

1 tbsp canola or olive oil

1/2 tsp salt

Preheat the oven to 425

Drain and press the tofu

Cut the tofu into 1/2 inch squares

Use half the oil to oil a cookie sheet

Spread the tofu out on the cookie sheet

Brush the rest of the oil on the tofu and sprinkle the salt

Cook for 30-40 minutes, flipping half way through

Prepare the veggies:

1.5 lbs broccoli, chopped into bite sized pieces

1 lb mushrooms (I used baby bella), cut into thick slices

3-4 tbsp olive oil

3/4 to 1.5 tsp salt

Mix half the olive oil and salt into the broccoli and spread it onto a cookie sheet

Mix the second half of the olive oil and salt into the mushrooms and spread them out onto a second cookie sheet

Put in the oven to cook for 20-25 minutes

While the veggies are cooking, make the dressing (I didn’t measure so this is approximate)

Combine together and blend:

3-4 tbsp tahini

1/2-3/4 tsp salt

3 sprigs fresh rosemary

1 sprig fresh sage

1 tbsp wine vinegar

2 tbsp olive oil

water or broth as needed to reach dressing consistency (I think I used 4 tbsp)

Serve with walnuts on top of the bowls.

Bharta (Mashed Eggplant with Peanuts and Spices)

I hadn’t made Indian food in a while, since I can’t eat beans or spicy food at the moment. But I’d read that sprouted mung beans were low fodmap and found a recipe for spiced sprouted mung beans in the Indian Vegetarian Cookbook. I wanted to make a vegetable to go with them, so I made this eggplant dish. This is an unusual preparation, as you first steam the eggplant before incorporating it into the rest of the dish. I didn’t like the result. The eggplant tasted watery and didn’t incorporate the flavor of the rest of the dish. I ended up adding some half and half, which improved the taste, but I wouldn’t make this again.

Summer Squash and Red Rice Salad with Lemon and Dill

On the harrowing quest to cook things that both Ian and I can eat, I found this salad, which could be made low fodmap and would use up my summer squash. I couldn’t find red rice so I used regular jasmine rice. I think I either mismeasured the dry rice or the picture for this recipe is quite dishonest. The picture shows a dish of mostly squash with a sprinkling of rice. As you can see from my photo, my dish was mostly rice with a smattering of squash. Despite this and my failure to find red rice, we enjoyed this recipe. It was super easy to make and would make a good weeknight dish when you already have summer squash or zucchini in the fridge.

I left out the garlic since Ian isn’t eating garlic. It only called for one clove so I can’t imagine it would have changed the dish a ton. I thought the 1/4 cup of olive oil called for was absurd and halve it. Without knowing this, Ian complained that the dish needed more olive oil and added more. I’m sure it would have tasted better with more, but I didn’t mind it as is. He also thought it needed more pine nuts. I would probably use 3 tbsp instead of 2 tbsp as called for, but I suspect he would still end up adding more. My main issue with the dish was that I thought it needed more dill and chives. I’d double those next time.

New England “Clam” Chowder

As the weather has begun to cool down at last in North Carolina, I’m finally ready for soups and stews again. Time to try Isa Chandra Moskowitz’ vegan take on clam chowder from Isa Does It. I’ve never had clam chowder, so I really have nothing to compare the recipe to. But I suspect this does not taste like clam chowder. Isa uses mushrooms and seaweed to add an umami and fishy flavor. I’m not sure I got enough of that though, as the flavor was a bit on the dull side. I suspect the seaweed and mushrooms weren’t in the broth long enough to give all their flavor. On the other hand though, I thought the potatoes were too soft, so I wouldn’t want to cook for any longer. I did use kombu instead of nori. I’m not sure if nori wouldn’t have given a lot more flavor since my seaweed knowledge is on the lighter side.

The recipe does have the requisite creaminess, thanks to cashew cream. But I found that the broth to veggie ratio was off. I ended up adding 2 cups of extra liquid, which seemed about right.

I’m non the fence about whether I will make this again. But if I do, I’ll tweak several things:

  1. I’ll make special vegetable broth for the dish that includes sewaeed and dried mushrooms in it to up the sea flavor factor without overcooking the veggies.
  2. I’d use 4 cups of vegetable broth when I put in the potatoes instead of 2.
  3. I’d only cook the potatoes for 7 minutes instead of the 10-15 called for in the recipe. I prefer my potatoes to still have some bite to them.

Sheet Pan Crisp Tofu and Sweet Potatoes

I’d had a sweet potato in my house for a while that I needed to use. This recipe looked interesting, so I borrowed Ian’s non-broken oven to make it. The results were mixed. The recipe is very sloppily written and the proportions of sweet potato to tofu are very off. But the flavors were good. I’d make it again, fixing the instructions and the proportions.

The recipe doesn’t call to oil the pans before putting the tofu or sweet potatoes in them. This. seemed like a big mistake to me so I oiled them ahead of tie.

It’s very unclear in its instructions for preparing the tofu. It says “Toss half the mixture with the tofu, then toss in cornstarch”. I’m really not sure how you are supposed to “toss” cut tofu without breaking it. And there’s only a tablespoon of cornstarch in the recipe, which is not enough for a block of tofu in any format. I ended up using my mother’s tried and true method for making baked tofu. I dipped the slices in the liquid mixture and then dipped in the cornstarch. I needed to use more cornstarch than the recipe called for- maybe 3 tbsp? Despite this major glitch, the tofu was super tasty. I’d definitely make it again. But it was gone long before the sweet potato. I do not buy that this recipe makes 4 servings as it says. In my experience, no matter what it say on the package, a block of tofu makes 2-3 servings, depending on the appetite of the people you’re serving. Next time I make this I’d 1.5 the tofu. The recipe also doesn’t mention flipping the tofu, which I did half way through.

Do not skip the scallions in vinegar. They make the dish. So simple and so tasty. I also think some sesame seeds sprinkled on top would have been good as well. I’d add them next time.

Sweet and [Not] Spicy Tofu With Soba Noodles

Apparently I’ve been on a bit of a noodle kick lately. This recipe was appealing since it offers a non-salad way to use fresh cucumber from my garden. This dish was alright, but I’m not sure if I liked it enough to make it again. I halved the sugar, but still found it a bit too sweet. The only thing spicy in the dish was red pepper flakes. I left those out since I’m avoiding spice. Maybe they would have balanced the sweetness a bit more. I also added pan fried tofu for protein.